research & development  global Health

Revolutionary change often begins where we least expect it.

Our optimistic vision for the future of health is based around a simple thesis: Countries that are fast-emerging will relentlessly, often brilliantly, skip the present and jump to the future of how healthcare is conceived and delivered. We believe the first learning health system will be in the developing world. >

Google announced in 2016 that it would now be organizing the world’s information for mobile; the desktop computer was no longer the point of reference. Google explained the shift as responsive; most people search Google using a mobile device. They called this strategy mobile-first.

Google [the core of Alphabet] is a corporation worth about ¾ of a trillion US dollars. Google is one of the wealthiest and most technologically sophisticated corporations in the world.

Yet millions of people across Asia and Africa seized this strategic opportunity long before Google and started to organize their lives around mobile. Many countries in Africa leaped from limited fixed-line telecom infrastructure to societies where the majority of adults have access to a mobile phone. These countries skipped the present and jumped ahead to the future.

What does this have to do with global health?

Our optimistic vision for the future of health is based around a simple thesis: Countries that are fast-emerging will relentlessly, often brilliantly, skip the present and jump to the future of how healthcare is conceived and delivered. We believe the first learning health system will be in the developing world.

 Email sign-up powered by MailChimp   Privacy Policy

©2013-2018 Macro-Eyes, Inc. All rights reserved.